Validating xml without namespace

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From there, you could make the leap to other wild cats, then to house cats and maybe even dogs (cats and dogs are both pets, after all).

With very little effort, you’d be able to build a stunning semantic landscape, as it were.

Semantics and Other Jargon You’re going to be hearing a lot of talk about “semantics” and other linguistics terms in this chapter. For example, if I asked you to list as many names for “female animals” as you could, you’d probably start with “lioness”, “tigress”, “ewe”, “doe” and so on.

If you were presented with a list of these names and asked to provide a category that contained them all, it’s likely you’d say something like “female animals.” Furthermore, if I asked you what a lioness was, you’d say, “female lion.” If I further asked you to list associated words, you might say “pride,” “hunt,” “savannah,” “Africa,” and the like.

The most recognizable feature of XML is its tags, or elements (to be more accurate).

However, it’s important to realize that XML is not just a language.

As always, you can download this excerpt as a PDF if you prefer. Whenever I talk about XML with developers, designers, technical writers, or other Web professionals, the most common question I’m asked is, “What’s the big deal?

” In this book, I’ll explain exactly what the big deal is – how XML can be used to make your Web applications smarter, more versatile, and more powerful.

HTML’s sole purpose is to allow anyone to quickly create Web documents that can be shared with other people.

XML, on the other hand, isn’t just suited to the Web – it can be used in a variety of different contexts, some of which may not have anything to do with humans interacting with content (for example, Web Services use XML to send requests and responses back and forth).

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